Rev. Bracy to Spearhead Launch of B-CU School of Religion — Bethune-Cookman University

Bethune Cookman University

Bethune-Cookman Uni­ver­sity has named Rev. Dr. Ran­dolph Bracy Jr. a Dis­tin­guished Pro­fes­sor and appointed him to help launch a new School of Reli­gion.
The new School of Reli­gion at B-CU is sched­uled to enroll its first stu­dents in 2015, Bracy said. The school will offer a master’s of divin­ity and a master’s of art in reli­gion. Fifty to 75 stu­dents will com­prise the inau­gural class.

The founder of B-CU, Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune, believed in Chris­t­ian prin­ci­ples and she loved the Lord,” B-CU Pres­i­dent Dr. Edi­son O. Jack­son said. “Thus, a School of Reli­gion is a build­ing block on the foun­da­tional prin­ci­ples that she embraced. This is just an exten­sion of her dream and her vision for the uni­ver­sity. Dr. Bethune would be delighted if she were alive today.”

The school will not only train pas­tors, but will also develop youth min­is­ters, admin­is­tra­tors and oth­ers inter­ested in serv­ing in the min­istry, Bracy said. Also, the school will offer a broad appeal to all races.

We want to offer a global per­spec­tive on Chris­tian­ity, so we will reach out to His­pan­ics, Asians and other groups that have been his­tor­i­cally under­rep­re­sented. We can help with the train­ing of the future pas­tors of these churches,” Jack­son said.

Bracy, a 1967 grad­u­ate of Bethune-Cookman, has earned a master’s of edu­ca­tion from Florida A&M Uni­ver­sity, a master’s of divin­ity from the Colgate-Rochester Divin­ity School and a doc­tor­ate of edu­ca­tion from the Uni­ver­sity of Florida.

Over his 35-year his­tory in min­istry, Bracy has the dis­tinc­tion of hav­ing preached on six of the seven con­ti­nents with the excep­tion of Antar­tica. He con­tin­ues to be involved in the life and min­istry of sev­eral denom­i­na­tions via Bible con­fer­ences, lay acad­e­mies, retreats, revivals and church growth conferences.

Bracy has served as a vis­it­ing pro­fes­sor and lec­turer at the Lutheran The­o­log­i­cal Sem­i­nary of Philadel­phia; the Palmer The­o­log­i­cal Sem­i­nary of Philadel­phia; the Colgate-Rochester Divin­ity School in New York; and as adjunct pro­fes­sor of Homilet­ics and Black Church His­tory at the Asbury The­o­log­i­cal Sem­i­nary in Florida.

A for­mer trustee at Bethune-Cookman Uni­ver­sity, Bracy serves on the Board of Advi­sors at the Col­lege of Law at the Florida A&M Uni­ver­sity Law School. Also, he has served as pres­i­dent of the Orange County branch of the NAACP. He and his wife, Dr. LaVon Wright Bracy, retired from the New Covenant Bap­tist Church of Orlando in 2012.

Bracy and his wife are the par­ents of two chil­dren and two grandchildren.

Rev. Bracy to Spear­head Launch of B-CU School of Reli­gion — Bethune-Cookman Uni­ver­sity.

B-CU to start new religion school

News Journal-online

DAYTONA BEACH — Bethune-Cookman Uni­ver­sity has named the Rev. Ran­dolph Bracy Jr. a Dis­tin­guished Pro­fes­sor and appointed him to help launch a new School of Religion.

The school is sched­uled to enroll its first stu­dents in 2015, Bracy said in a state­ment. The school will offer a master’s of divin­ity and a master’s of art in Chris­t­ian stud­ies. Fifty to 75 stu­dents will com­prise the inau­gural class.

Pres­i­dent Edi­son Jack­son said the school “is a build­ing block on the foun­da­tional prin­ci­ples” that founder Mary McLeod Bethune embraced.

The school will not only train pas­tors but also develop youth min­is­ters, admin­is­tra­tors and oth­ers inter­ested in serv­ing in the min­istry, Bracy said.

We want to offer a global per­spec­tive on Chris­tian­ity, so we will reach out to His­pan­ics, Asians and other groups that have been his­tor­i­cally under­rep­re­sented,” said Bracy, a 1967 grad­u­ate of Bethune-Cookman and for­mer board trustee who earned a master’s of edu­ca­tion from Florida A&M Uni­ver­sity, a master’s of divin­ity from the Colgate-Rochester Divin­ity School and a doc­tor­ate of edu­ca­tion from the Uni­ver­sity of Florida. “We can help with the train­ing of the future pas­tors of these churches.”

— Deb­o­rah Circelli

B-CU to start new reli­gion school | News-JournalOnline.com.

America is still fighting the Civil War

Rev. Randolph Bracy, Jr.

On this sesqui­cen­ten­nial of the great­est bat­tle of the Civil War — the Bat­tle of Get­tys­burg — present-day cir­cum­stances and sit­u­a­tions have caused me to pon­der: Are we as a nation fight­ing the war again?

Look­ing at the present national ter­rain, it is obvi­ous that we are a sharply divided nation with red states rep­re­sent­ing the Old South and blue states rep­re­sent­ing the rest of the nation. It also seems that the lessons from one of the costli­est bat­tles of all time, where more than 50,000 men were lost, have not been learned.

It was George San­tayana who said, “Those who can­not remem­ber the past are con­demned to repeat it.”

A case in point. Recently, I was talk­ing with a Cen­tral Florida cau­casian per­son­al­ity, and our talk turned to race. He gave me the spiel that he was a “son of the South” and that he took great pride in being one of the descen­dants of the Con­fed­er­ate army.

What really dis­turbed me was his call­ing the Civil War “the war of North­ern aggression.”

When he fin­ished, I took my turn to upbraid and give him a his­tory les­son. I said I, too, was a son of the South, hav­ing been born and reared in Florida. The dif­fer­ence was that I could trace my her­itage directly to slav­ery; my ances­tors were brought to this coun­try in bondage from the mother coun­try Africa in 1619.

I also told him about the Dred Scott deci­sion, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Dred Scott, a Negro, had no rights what­so­ever. He was prop­erty, not a per­son or a cit­i­zen. He had no right to sue in fed­eral court.

Fur­ther, the court ruled that the fed­eral gov­ern­ment had no legal right to inter­fere with the insti­tu­tion of slav­ery. Finally, I rec­om­mended to him that he read Fred­er­ick Dou­glass’ speech, “What to the slave is the Fourth of July?”

Now fast-forward to the present day. Even though the bat­tle has taken a much dif­fer­ent form than 150 years ago, much remains the same.

Look at the open defi­ance of nul­li­fi­ca­tion by the South­ern states in reject­ing the Afford­able Care Act. Look again at the recent rul­ing by the Supreme Court on vot­ing rights, espe­cially in its impact on the 15th Amend­ment of the Con­sti­tu­tion, which guar­an­teed blacks the right to vote.

From where I sit, it appears that we are fight­ing the Civil War all over again.

The Rev. Ran­dolph Bracy Jr. is for­mer pres­i­dent of the Orange County branch of the NAACP.

Rev. Randolph Bracy — Orlando Sentinel

Rev. Ran­dolph Bracy — Orlando Sen­tinel.

Jan­u­ary 5, 2012|Jeff Kunerth

New Covenant Bap­tist Church of Orlando Rev. Ran­dolph Bracy Jr. and his wife, LaVon, have announced their retire­ment from the church the end of this year. They’ve sched­uled a farewell tour of sorts with a num­ber of promi­nent guest speak­ers and preach­ers vis­it­ing New Covenant through­out the year.

But a web­site cre­ated by Bracy looks like the preacher and for­mer head of the Orange Branch of the NAACP has post-retirement plans to make a sec­ond career as a speaker, con­sul­tant, and counselor. In a video on his web­site www.reverandrandolphbracyjr.com, Bracy talks about his future plans.

The pur­pose of this web­site is two-fold. One, to give you a broader per­spec­tive of who I am. And num­ber two, to fur­nish you with the under­stand­ing of the kinds of expo­sures, expe­ri­ences, edu­ca­tion and exper­tise that I might be able to share with you in the future,” he said.

Bracy lists some of those future endeav­ors: preach­ing at revivals, leading con­fer­ence work­shops, teach­ing college-level reli­gion and Bible classes, con­duct­ing church lead­er­ship con­fer­ences, medi­at­ing pas­toral con­tract nego­ti­a­tions, coun­sel­ing pas­tors, and hold­ing mar­riage cou­ple workshops.

Honoring Reverend Randolph Bracy, Jr.‘s Service To the Florida Community

Hon­or­ing Rev­erend Ran­dolph Bracy, Jr.‘s Ser­vice To the Florida Com­mu­nity.

Rep. Alan Grayson

Madam Speaker, I rise today to honor Rev­erend Ran­dolph Bracy, Jr. for his ded­i­cated ser­vice to his church, our cen­tral Florida com­mu­nity, and our great State of Florida. Born on Novem­ber 4, 1944, Rev­erend Bracy, Jr. is a native of Jack­sonville, Florida and has since given a great deal back to our community.

Rev­erend Bracy, Jr. grad­u­ated from Bethune-Cookman Col­lege, Day­tona Beach, Florida in 1967 with a Bach­e­lor of Sci­ence Degree in Biol­ogy. In 1970, he pur­sued grad­u­ate stud­ies in Guid­ance and Coun­sel­ing, and grad­u­ated from Florida A&M Uni­ver­sity with a Master’s of Edu­ca­tion Degree. Later in 1974, he earned the Doc­tor of Edu­ca­tion Degree from the Uni­ver­sity of Florida in Higher Edu­ca­tion Admin­is­tra­tion. In 1982, he received the Mas­ter of Divin­ity Degree from Colgate-Rochester Divin­ity School in Rochester, New York. In 1999, he earned a cer­tifi­cate at the Cen­ter for the Study of Val­ues in Pub­lic Life at the Har­vard Divin­ity School in Cam­bridge, Mass­a­chu­setts with the Sum­mer Lead­er­ship Insti­tute. In 2004, he pre­sented a paper at the Oxford Round Table on Reli­gion, Edu­ca­tion and the Role of Gov­ern­ment at the Uni­ver­sity of Oxford in Eng­land. Rev­erend Bracy’s edu­ca­tional accom­plish­ments are only sur­passed by his com­mit­ment and work in the community.

In 1991, he joined the Shiloh Mis­sion­ary Bap­tist Church of Orlando, Florida. In August 1992, he and his wife, Dr. LaVon Wright Bracy, led the orga­ni­za­tion of the New Covenant Bap­tist Church of Orlando. The New Covenant Church has grown to a mem­ber­ship of more than 2,000. The New Covenant Church has cre­ated a char­ter school to edu­cate and men­tor hun­dreds of youth. They have cre­ated a com­mu­nity devel­op­ment cor­po­ra­tion that has rehabbed neigh­bor­hoods, cre­ated safe havens for after-school and com­mu­nity activ­i­ties, and pro­vided finan­cial and hous­ing counseling.

As Pres­i­dent of the local NAACP, he has worked tire­lessly for human and civil rights for all peo­ple. He has inspired and men­tored a gen­er­a­tion of new lead­ers and for that I am proud to call him my friend and ally for justice.

Madam Speaker, as Black His­tory Month comes to a close, it is with great honor that I rec­og­nize Rev­erend Bracy, Jr.‘s incred­i­ble work and his lead­er­ship in the African Amer­i­can com­mu­nity and in our Florida com­mu­nity as a whole. He pro­vides inspi­ra­tion for the peo­ple in his com­mu­nity and is a great activist.