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Blog & News - Introducing Randolph Bracy, Jr.

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Rev. Bracy to Spearhead Launch of B-CU School of Religion – Bethune-Cookman University

Bethune Cookman University

Bethune-Cookman University has named Rev. Dr. Randolph Bracy Jr. a Distinguished Professor and appointed him to help launch a new School of Religion.
The new School of Religion at B-CU is scheduled to enroll its first students in 2015, Bracy said. The school will offer a master’s of divinity and a master’s of art in religion. Fifty to 75 students will comprise the inaugural class.

“The founder of B-CU, Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune, believed in Christian principles and she loved the Lord,” B-CU President Dr. Edison O. Jackson said. “Thus, a School of Religion is a building block on the foundational principles that she embraced. This is just an extension of her dream and her vision for the university. Dr. Bethune would be delighted if she were alive today.”

The school will not only train pastors, but will also develop youth ministers, administrators and others interested in serving in the ministry, Bracy said. Also, the school will offer a broad appeal to all races.

“We want to offer a global perspective on Christianity, so we will reach out to Hispanics, Asians and other groups that have been historically underrepresented. We can help with the training of the future pastors of these churches,” Jackson said.

Bracy, a 1967 graduate of Bethune-Cookman, has earned a master’s of education from Florida A&M University, a master’s of divinity from the Colgate-Rochester Divinity School and a doctorate of education from the University of Florida.

Over his 35-year history in ministry, Bracy has the distinction of having preached on six of the seven continents with the exception of Antartica. He continues to be involved in the life and ministry of several denominations via Bible conferences, lay academies, retreats, revivals and church growth conferences.

Bracy has served as a visiting professor and lecturer at the Lutheran Theological Seminary of Philadelphia; the Palmer Theological Seminary of Philadelphia; the Colgate-Rochester Divinity School in New York; and as adjunct professor of Homiletics and Black Church History at the Asbury Theological Seminary in Florida.

A former trustee at Bethune-Cookman University, Bracy serves on the Board of Advisors at the College of Law at the Florida A&M University Law School. Also, he has served as president of the Orange County branch of the NAACP. He and his wife, Dr. LaVon Wright Bracy, retired from the New Covenant Baptist Church of Orlando in 2012.

Bracy and his wife are the parents of two children and two grandchildren.

Rev. Bracy to Spearhead Launch of B-CU School of Religion – Bethune-Cookman University.

B-CU to start new religion school

News Journal-online

DAYTONA BEACH — Bethune-Cookman University has named the Rev. Randolph Bracy Jr. a Distinguished Professor and appointed him to help launch a new School of Religion.

The school is scheduled to enroll its first students in 2015, Bracy said in a statement. The school will offer a master’s of divinity and a master’s of art in Christian studies. Fifty to 75 students will comprise the inaugural class.

President Edison Jackson said the school “is a building block on the foundational principles” that founder Mary McLeod Bethune embraced.

The school will not only train pastors but also develop youth ministers, administrators and others interested in serving in the ministry, Bracy said.

“We want to offer a global perspective on Christianity, so we will reach out to Hispanics, Asians and other groups that have been historically underrepresented,” said Bracy, a 1967 graduate of Bethune-Cookman and former board trustee who earned a master’s of education from Florida A&M University, a master’s of divinity from the Colgate-Rochester Divinity School and a doctorate of education from the University of Florida. “We can help with the training of the future pastors of these churches.”

— Deborah Circelli

B-CU to start new religion school | News-JournalOnline.com.

America is still fighting the Civil War

Rev. Randolph Bracy, Jr.

On this sesquicentennial of the greatest battle of the Civil War — the Battle of Gettysburg — present-day circumstances and situations have caused me to ponder: Are we as a nation fighting the war again?

Looking at the present national terrain, it is obvious that we are a sharply divided nation with red states representing the Old South and blue states representing the rest of the nation. It also seems that the lessons from one of the costliest battles of all time, where more than 50,000 men were lost, have not been learned.

It was George Santayana who said, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

A case in point. Recently, I was talking with a Central Florida caucasian personality, and our talk turned to race. He gave me the spiel that he was a “son of the South” and that he took great pride in being one of the descendants of the Confederate army.

What really disturbed me was his calling the Civil War “the war of Northern aggression.”

When he finished, I took my turn to upbraid and give him a history lesson. I said I, too, was a son of the South, having been born and reared in Florida. The difference was that I could trace my heritage directly to slavery; my ancestors were brought to this country in bondage from the mother country Africa in 1619.

I also told him about the Dred Scott decision, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Dred Scott, a Negro, had no rights whatsoever. He was property, not a person or a citizen. He had no right to sue in federal court.

Further, the court ruled that the federal government had no legal right to interfere with the institution of slavery. Finally, I recommended to him that he read Frederick Douglass’ speech, “What to the slave is the Fourth of July?”

Now fast-forward to the present day. Even though the battle has taken a much different form than 150 years ago, much remains the same.

Look at the open defiance of nullification by the Southern states in rejecting the Affordable Care Act. Look again at the recent ruling by the Supreme Court on voting rights, especially in its impact on the 15th Amendment of the Constitution, which guaranteed blacks the right to vote.

From where I sit, it appears that we are fighting the Civil War all over again.

The Rev. Randolph Bracy Jr. is former president of the Orange County branch of the NAACP.

Rev. Randolph Bracy – Orlando Sentinel

Rev. Randolph Bracy – Orlando Sentinel.

January 5, 2012|Jeff Kunerth

New Covenant Baptist Church of Orlando Rev. Randolph Bracy Jr. and his wife, LaVon, have announced their retirement from the church the end of this year. They’ve scheduled a farewell tour of sorts with a number of prominent guest speakers and preachers visiting New Covenant throughout the year.

But a website created by Bracy looks like the preacher and former head of the Orange Branch of the NAACP has post-retirement plans to make a second career as a speaker, consultant, and counselor. In a video on his website www.reverandrandolphbracyjr.com, Bracy talks about his future plans.

“The purpose of this website is two-fold. One, to give you a broader perspective of who I am. And number two, to furnish you with the understanding of the kinds of exposures, experiences, education and expertise that I might be able to share with you in the future,” he said.

Bracy lists some of those future endeavors: preaching at revivals, leading conference workshops, teaching college-level religion and Bible classes, conducting church leadership conferences, mediating pastoral contract negotiations, counseling pastors, and holding marriage couple workshops.

Honoring Reverend Randolph Bracy, Jr.’s Service To the Florida Community

Honoring Reverend Randolph Bracy, Jr.’s Service To the Florida Community.

Rep. Alan Grayson

Madam Speaker, I rise today to honor Reverend Randolph Bracy, Jr. for his dedicated service to his church, our central Florida community, and our great State of Florida. Born on November 4, 1944, Reverend Bracy, Jr. is a native of Jacksonville, Florida and has since given a great deal back to our community.

Reverend Bracy, Jr. graduated from Bethune-Cookman College, Daytona Beach, Florida in 1967 with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology. In 1970, he pursued graduate studies in Guidance and Counseling, and graduated from Florida A&M University with a Master’s of Education Degree. Later in 1974, he earned the Doctor of Education Degree from the University of Florida in Higher Education Administration. In 1982, he received the Master of Divinity Degree from Colgate-Rochester Divinity School in Rochester, New York. In 1999, he earned a certificate at the Center for the Study of Values in Public Life at the Harvard Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts with the Summer Leadership Institute. In 2004, he presented a paper at the Oxford Round Table on Religion, Education and the Role of Government at the University of Oxford in England. Reverend Bracy’s educational accomplishments are only surpassed by his commitment and work in the community.

In 1991, he joined the Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church of Orlando, Florida. In August 1992, he and his wife, Dr. LaVon Wright Bracy, led the organization of the New Covenant Baptist Church of Orlando. The New Covenant Church has grown to a membership of more than 2,000. The New Covenant Church has created a charter school to educate and mentor hundreds of youth. They have created a community development corporation that has rehabbed neighborhoods, created safe havens for after-school and community activities, and provided financial and housing counseling.

As President of the local NAACP, he has worked tirelessly for human and civil rights for all people. He has inspired and mentored a generation of new leaders and for that I am proud to call him my friend and ally for justice.

Madam Speaker, as Black History Month comes to a close, it is with great honor that I recognize Reverend Bracy, Jr.’s incredible work and his leadership in the African American community and in our Florida community as a whole. He provides inspiration for the people in his community and is a great activist.